Who is the best PP$ Play at Tight End in Week 7?

With Rob Gronkowski and Jordan Reed playing on Sunday and Monday nights, respectively, and Travis Kelce playing on Thursday night, the top tight ends on the main slate are Delanie Walker, Austin Seferian-Jenkins, Jimmy Graham, Cameron Brate, Jason Witten and Evan Engram. Which of these tight end's will you have exposure to in week 7? Are there any better PP$ options out there at the position? 

BJ VanderWoude: With Rob Gronkowski and Jordan Reed playing on Sunday and Monday nights, respectively, and Travis Kelce playing on Thursday night, the top tight ends on the main slate are Delanie Walker, Austin Seferian-Jenkins, Jimmy Graham, Cameron Brate, Jason Witten and Evan Engram. Which of these tight end's will you have exposure to in week 7? Are there any better PP$ options out there at the position? 

Jason Wood: Delanie Walker has to be atop the list. The Titans face Cleveland this week and the Browns have allowed 8 more points to opposing fantasy tight ends (using PPR scoring) than the average NFL defense. They're the easiest defense in the league against tight ends. The Jets (Sefarian-Jenkins) and Seahawks (Graham) also have two of the easiest matchups of the week. All three will factor into my lineup matrix. 

John Mamula: Of the tight ends listed, Austin Seferian-Jenkins peaks my interest most. He is starting to emerge as the go-to receiving option for the Jets and an every-week TE1. Josh McCown has a history of leaning on the tight end position as he turned Gary Barnidge into a fantasy force (79 receptions for 1043 yards and 9 touchdowns) just two seasons ago. Seferian-Jenkins has at least four receptions in every game this season and a touchdown in each of the past two weeks (should have been multiple touchdowns this past week against the Patriots!).

Phil Alexander: Tight end has been so hit or miss this year, not having to consider paying way up for one on this slate is a welcome change. All of the guys mentioned in the body of the question are in play. Walker and Graham are top talents in A+ matchups, Seferian-Jenkins and Engram are effectively the WR1s on their respective teams, all Brate does is score a touchdown every week, and Witten is a high-floor option due to his reliable target volume. 

One tight end I'm looking at whose name wasn't listed is Hunter Henry. The Chargers have shifted to more two tight end sets in each of their last two games, which has resulted in back-to-back games with roughly 80% of the offensive snaps for Henry. The extra field time has predictably resulted in more targets. Henry has a combined 15 targets in his last two games, compared to a total of 10 through his first four. His price on DraftKings only increased by $100 despite consecutive games with more than 13 fantasy points, and tight end happens to be Denver's weakness on defense. The Broncos entered last week ranked 26th in pass defense DVOA vs. tight ends and proceeded to give up a 5-82-1 receiving line to Engram on Sunday night. Denver hasn't allowed less than seven tight end targets in a game since Week 1.  This is the last week we'll be able to use Henry at a discount.

Justin Howe: It’s depressing to see so many options simultaneously priced at their ceilings. I’ve always finished well when rostering the likes of Value Brate, Value Engram, and even Value Seferian-Jenkins. But that’s not happening this week, where I’d essentially have to pay for a touchdown and/or a five- or six-catch game. I love those guys I mentioned, but (with the possible exception of Engram) they’re not legitimate threats to score that far beyond their costs. If I’m paying up, I’d much rather get some ceiling on the side; this is what I typically pay for Greg Olsen!

Besides, I’ve had much more 2017 success in chasing low-cost tight end value, so that’s the plan for most of my exposure. I see similar ceilings to the names above in:

Kyle Rudolph – He’s re-establishing himself as a target hog (nine in each of the last two games) for Case Keenum’s safe, short-oriented offense, and he’s always carried touchdown potential.

Jack Doyle – When T.Y. Hilton isn’t the Colts No. 1, Doyle is. He’s posted games of 8, 7, and 11 targets with Jacoby Brissett, and even though he lacks dynamism, a simple 6-catch line will drag him to value.

George Kittle – He’s the second option in San Francisco now, with only one-dimensional speedsters to bookend Pierre Garcon at wideout. Kittle has drawn 17 looks over the past 2 weeks and will now catch passes exclusively from his quarterback from last season at Iowa.
 
Chris Feery: A case can be made for any of the tight ends listed, but Delanie Walker and Jimmy Graham appear to be the safest choices based on the early struggles of their opponents in covering the position. The Cleveland Browns and New York Giants have allowed five and seven touchdowns to tight ends thus far this year respectively, and there’s nothing to suggest that the leak in their respective defenses will be sealed overnight. For a little more risk, I’ll be looking towards Evan Engram, who has developed a nice rapport with Eli Manning. While that can easily be dismissed as being out of necessity due to the injuries that have ravaged Giants pass catchers, there’s a bit more to see here. Similar to his older brother, Manning seems to operate much more effectively when he has a tight end he can rely on. He has that in Engram, who saw seven of Manning’s 19 total pass attempts sail in his direction last week against the Denver Broncos. I’ll likely have some exposure to all three of these tight ends, and I’ll be looking closely at Hunter Henry, George Kittle, and Austin Seferian-Jenkins as well.