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Week 2 Game Recap: Seattle Seahawks 17, Chicago Bears 24


What you need to know

Seattle Seahawks

Despite coaching staff quotes to the contrary, the RB position is a far from settled. Head Coach Pete Carroll expressed that Chris Carson was his lead back, and then gave all the touches to Rashaad Penny in the second half, in addition to using C.J. Prosise in the 2-minute drills. None of them met with much success. The offensive line (and by extension, running backs and tight ends), simply cannot handle the blitz. For the second week in a row, Russell Wilson was sacked six times. Watching this offense for the first three quarters was like watching a train wreck, that you couldn’t turn away from because you couldn’t quite believe it was this bad. (It was).

Chicago Bears

The Bears utilized their defense to set up their offense in this one as their defense was simply outstanding in applying pressure to the Seahawks consistently throughout the game. Once again for the Bears, Trubisky had a less than impressive outing as he threw two interceptions and was inaccurate on the deep passes missing several open receivers for what would have been big games. The bright spot on offense was Allen Robinson who saw 14 of the team's 34 targets in this game. The running game struggled in this one as Jordan Howard had a difficult time getting any production while Tarik Cohen and Taylor Gabriel were unable to find success on the outside

Seattle Seahawks

QB Russell Wilson, 66 offensive snaps, Pass: 22 - 36 - 226 - 2 TD / 1 INT, Rush: 3 - 17 - 0
Let us count the ways in which Russell Wilson struggled…. The opening drive was played quite conservatively, leaning on a running game that never did establish itself. On the first passing call, the pocket closed FAST, and Wilson wasn’t able to scramble out of it, which would be a harbinger of things to come. There was miscommunication on a simple checkdown missed pass to a surprised Rashaad Penny, as Wilson tried to lead him to the right with the short throw. Wilson nearly gave up a safety as he got sacked right at his own goal line. And late in the game – while the Seahawks were miraculously still in it – he gave up a very avoidable pick-six, and lost a costly fumble (while being sacked one final time), both of which looked like rookie level mistakes. The good? There wasn’t much, but… His reputation for clutch play stood strong for a while, as Wilson did have a few shining moments, exclusively in the waning moments of each half. Near the end of the first half, he was able to quickly drive the offense to within field goal range (a 55 yarder, which is well within Sebastian Janikowski’s range) for the ‘Hawks first points of the game. Later, in the 4th quarter, he aired the ball out perfectly, with the play action giving him just enough time to find Tyler Lockett for a beautiful touchdown in tight 1-on-1 coverage. And in the last minute, down by 2, he brought the team in for one more too-little-too-late score, finding rookie TE Will Dissly in the sea of Bears DBs. It was a very nice read by the veteran QB, who clearly had not given up just yet. Wilson is dearly missing WR Doug Baldwin, or any real go-to guy to speak of. Tyler Lockett made some great plays, but was invisible in the first half; while Brandon Marshall looked great as a complementary receiver as well. Wilson is ultra-patient in the pocket, but with his sieve of an offensive line, that’s not a good trait to possess right now.

RB Rashaad Penny, 20 offensive snaps, Rush: 10 - 30 - 0 (2 targets)
It seems they want to get Penny the ball, as he took over the lead duties in the second half. He didn’t look entirely out of place, but also didn’t exactly spark the team in the process. It was evident that he brings some speed to the table, but he was unable to break free or catch a ball to truly display his talents in that department. On one play, he was targeted on an incomplete checkdown pass and was simply not on the same page with Wilson as the quarterback tried to feed him a leading pass away from the defender. There were a few positive moments. He found a seam on one inside run, gaining ten, which showed what he can do when he finds a little bit of room; and almost made good on a cutback away from the called play (once it was clear he was going nowhere), but couldn’t quite get free and settled for a gain of six. Overall, the game simply looked faster than Penny right now. He missed most of training camp, and so it’s possible that he’s not only getting up to speed, but the coaches are still figuring out how to use him.

RB Chris Carson, 19 offensive snaps, Rush: 6 - 24 - 0 (1 targets)
Carson took the first play up the gut for an impressive 8 yard gain. It was all downhill (and not in a good way) from there, as the Seahawks yet again failed to establish their running game. He showed a nice burst into the line, and there were times when Carson used an extra gear to break a tackle, but he never found open field. In the second half, all of the touches went to other backs.

RB C.J. Prosise, 18 offensive snaps, Rec: 3 - 22 - 0 (3 targets)
It seems they want to get Penny the ball, as he took over the lead duties in the second half. He didn’t look entirely out of place, but also didn’t exactly spark the team in the process. It was evident that he brings some speed to the table, but he was unable to break free or catch a ball to truly display his talents in that department. On one play, he was targeted on an incomplete checkdown pass and was simply not on the same page with Wilson as the quarterback tried to feed him a leading pass away from the defender. There were a few positive moments. He found a seam on one inside run, gaining ten, which showed what he can do when he finds a little bit of room; and almost made good on a cutback away from the called play (once it was clear he was going nowhere), but couldn’t quite get free and settled for a gain of six. Overall, the game simply looked faster than Penny right now. He missed most of training camp, and so it’s possible that he’s not only getting up to speed, but the coaches are still figuring out how to use him.

WR Tyler Lockett, 60 offensive snaps, Rec: 5 - 60 - 1 (7 targets)
Lockett was nearly invisible in the opening three quarters, but made his mark in the 4th. The only sighting of him early on was in the final minute of the first half, in which he snagged the ball on a quick slant pattern, to help set up an end-of-half field goal. Late in the game, however, he was targeted three times on deep patterns, with the third one being the charm. The ball was thrown up for him in extremely tight – actually, that doesn’t quite describe it; let’s call it like it was: saran-wrap-tight-one-on-one coverage – at the back corner of the end zone. Lockett played the ball and timed it perfectly to bring in the improbable touchdown pass. He followed that up with one more catch, an 11 yard gain on a final-minute broken play as Russell Wilson scrambled and found him for the catch.

WR Brandon Marshall, 53 offensive snaps, Rec: 4 - 44 - 0 (6 targets)
Marshall continues to impress, winning his one-on-one battles for the ball, and showing rookie-like hustle coming back for the ball and fighting to move the chains. He was the closest thing to a go-to guy the Seahawks had this game, but that’s not saying much. Marshall’s reliable hands and route running, at this stage in his career, are clearly skills that better serve a team as a 2nd or even third receiver. He was arguably the Seahawks best player on offense in the first half, but gave way to Tyler Lockett’s mini-heroics in the second half.

WR Jaron Brown, 47 offensive snaps, Rec: 3 - 36 - 0 (3 targets)
Brown continued to underwhelm, while increasing his snap count from the first game, from 33 to 47. He didn’t do much with the extra playing time, however, as he dove to catch one first down pass in the early going, and then wasn’t noticeable until the final minute of the 4th quarter when he caught two passes as they neared the red zone. On one hand, he DID catch all of his targets, two of which were for first downs. Given the state of the passing game, it wouldn’t be that much of a stretch to see him get more involved, but for now, Brown is seemingly an afterthought.

TE Will Dissly, 47 offensive snaps, Rec: 3 - 42 - 1 (5 targets)
Dissly was not used prominently in the passing game, but once again surprised with a good looking seam catch over the middle, and a late touchdown grab in the end zone. With the poor state of the offensive line, that looks to be his ceiling right now, as he’ll be called on more often than not for his blocking skill.


Chicago Bears

QB Mitchell Trubisky, 66 offensive snaps, Pass: 25 - 34 - 200 - 2 TD / 2 INT, Rush: 5 - 24 - 0
Trubisky started slowly in this game as he had two interceptions in the first half one of which was tipped at the line of scrimmage and the other was a one on one deep ball to Allen Robinson that Trubisky left woefully short for an easy interception. Trubisky should have had a third in the first half in the Red Zone as he escaped what should have been an easy sack and then threw it up to the end zone where there were three Seahawks players closest to the ball. If not for some miscommunication on the Seahawks part it easily could have been a third interception. After some early game struggles, the Bears utilized Trubisky on the run more often which he seems to be more comfortable with as he hit Anthony Miller on a rollout touchdown highlighting his ability to throw accurately on the move.

RB Jordan Howard, 48 offensive snaps, Rush: 14 - 35 - 0, Rec: 3 - 33 - 0 (4 targets)
Jordan Howard never got going in this game as he had very little space inside the tackles to do much of anything. While these types of games are going to happen for a physical running back like Howard, the best news was that his week one receiving game was not a fluke as Howard was second on the team in yardage and showed tremendous concentration in the first quarter on a ball that could have been intercepted as Mychal Kendricks jumped the route. The ball slipped through Kendricks' hands and Howard showed the concentration to catch the ball after an initial bobble and continue up the field for 17 yards.

RB Tarik Cohen, 21 offensive snaps, Rush: 4 - 8 - 0, Rec: 1 - 17 - 0 (1 targets)
Tarik Cohen is going to be a volatile player this season as most big-play threats are. In this game, it was one of the down games for the running back as he failed to get anything going in this game. Cohen is the type of player that defenses can keep in check if they put a focus on and the Seahawks ensured that the speedsters for the Bears did not beat them.

WR Allen Robinson, 63 offensive snaps, Rec: 10 - 83 - 0 (14 targets)
Allen Robinson appears to be fully recovered from the ACL injury he suffered in 2017, as the receiver has made a much-needed improvement to the Bears wide receiving group. The Seahawks often left Robinson in one on one coverage due to the amount of speed that is on the field with Tarik Cohen and Taylor Gabriel. Robinson played the role as a possession receiver in this game as his longest reception was 14 yards often using his size against the inexperienced Seahawks secondary to get in position to make a catch. Robinson did beat Shaquill Griffin on a fly-route, however, Trubisky underthrew the ball that ended up being intercepted in what would have been a significant addition to Robinson's stat line.

WR Taylor Gabriel, 63 offensive snaps, Rush: 3 - 17 - 0, Rec: 4 - 30 - 0 (7 targets)
Much like Cohen, the Seahawks had a plan in this game to leave Allen Robinson one on one for a majority of the game and to ensure that they were not beaten by the big play. Gabriel came close to a big play in the second possession of the game as he overthrew Gabriel on a deep pass that would have resulted in a big gain and a possible touchdown.

TE Trey Burton, 57 offensive snaps, Rush: 1 - 2 - 0, Rec: 4 - 20 - 1 (4 targets)
After not being much of a factor in Week 1, Trey Burton is starting to be utilized in a different variety of formats. He scored a touchdown on a triple-option play in which he took a shovel pass up the middle for a touchdown. Burton who is a former college quarterback lined up at the position in this game in which he faked a handoff to Tarik Cohen and ran the ball for a two-yard gain. Burton's value comes from his ability to create matchup problems and it's a great sign moving forward that the Bears are using him this way.