Eyes Of the Guru (NFC East)
By John Norton
August 1st, 2012

And finally we come to the NFC East - home of the Super Bowl Champion New York Giants!

For reference, when I mention where guys finished in the rankings last season, my model will be the standard Footballguys scoring system which is nearly identical to the North American Fantasy Football Addicts (NAFFA) league I have run for the past 17 years. Feel free to check it out. Defensive scoring in this league is the standard stuff but keep in mind that rankings will vary a bit from league to league. From time to time I will reference the "rookie corner rule". Those of you who are familiar with the EOTG know what that is. For those who are new, the rookie corner rule is basically the fact that in the NFL, starting a rookie at corner is like throwing chum to the sharks. Offensive coordinators will target young and inexperienced players as weaknesses, thus these guys have an accelerated number of opportunities. Most often these guys are the cream of the crop at the position (which is why they are starting so soon) and their numbers will begin to drop sharply after their rookie seasons. When I mention tackle numbers, I do not lump assists and solo tackles together. Unless I make a reference one way or the other, I am talking about solo tackles. When I talk about a total number of takeaways for a player, I am counting interceptions, fumble recoveries and fumbles forced since all of these score very similarly in most scoring systems.

Dallas Cowboys

Defensive Linemen

The Cowboys have some quality players up front, but like many 3-4 teams they have no one who will overcome the limitations of the scheme to record useful numbers. Jay Ratliff comes closest to having a little value for fantasy owners. At 287 pounds he is the smallest 3-4 nose tackle in the league but may also be the most athletic. Ratliff has only reached 30 the tackle mark once in his career. That came in 2009 when he put up career highs in tackles at 33, assists with 18 and sacks at 7.5. That season he was among the top scoring interior linemen in the fantasy game. His production over the past two seasons has been considerably less. In fact his sack total has dropped in each of the past three seasons and he could manage just 2 in 2011. In leagues that start two interior linemen Ratliff is probably worth a shot as your number three, if only because there is so little production to be found... Jason Hatcher and Kenyon Coleman return as the starters at end. Both players are veterans and a good fit in the scheme. Hatcher had been a backup for most of his first five seasons in the league and finally got a shot at starting last season. He looked pretty good out of the gate with 6 tackles and a pair of sacks in the first two games. An injury in week three cost Hatcher the next three games and he was hit or miss the rest of the season. In the end he had started ten games and managed to lead all Dallas linemen with 4.5 sacks, but added only 20 solo tackles... Coleman is one of those 3-4 ends who will have a good season one year then vanish the next. His first tour in Dallas lasted from 2003 to 2006 and was rather uneventful. Coleman recorded his career best of 4 sack there in 2006 but never earned a starting job and never put up more than 26 tackles. As a starter for the Jets in 2007 and 2008 he came on strong combining for 100 solo tackles and 37 assists, but added only a sack and a half. Coleman's second year with the Browns in 2010 was the best of his career in terms of fantasy points. He was 50-18-2.5 that season but the Browns elected to let him walk when the decision was made to go with a 4-3 in 2011. Coleman returned to Dallas last season but seems to be jinxed when he wears that uniform. He was back at 23-13-1 in fifteen start last season. Maybe the Cowboys are just a jinx for linemen in general. The last box score friendly player they produced up front was Greg Ellis and that was before the 3-4. As with most teams that use this scheme, there is simply not much here for us to work with.

Fantasy Outlook

  • DE Jason Hatcher No value
  • DE Kenyon Coleman Minimal value at best
  • DE Marcus Spears No value
  • DE Sean Lissemore No value
  • DE Tyrone Crawford No value
  • NT Jay Ratliff Depth in tackle required leagues that start two
  • NT Josh Brent No value
  • Linebackers

    In DeMarcus Ware the Cowboys have one of the best 3-4 outside linebackers to ever strap on shoulder pads. He has six consecutive seasons with double digit sacks, has a career best of 20 and has forced 27 fumbles over his seven years in the league. The guy is simply a beast! His downfall in fantasy terms is the same as all outside backers in 3-4 schemes, he simply does not have enough tackle opportunity. In 2008 Ware had his best fantasy season at 69-15-20 with 6 forced fumbles. That year he was a top 10 linebacker in nearly any scoring system. Since that time he has averaged just less than 50 tackles a season and has not finished among the top twenty in any but big play based leagues. In 2011 Ware was 48-10-19.5 with 3 takeaways. That added up to about 160 fantasy points and was enough to make him the most valuable 3-4 OLB in the game, but it landed him at around number thirty in balanced scoring leagues. Because of his huge 2008 season and his impressive highlight reel, Ware is very often overvalued by owners who have not done their homework. In big play base scoring systems he is the undisputed number one linebacker, but for everyone else he is a good number three starter or an excellent bye week fill in with the potential for a huge game when you need him. The moral of this story is that owners must know their scoring system and where a player like this is valued in it... The Cowboys used their first round pick in 2007 on Anthony Spencer with the expectation that he would be the much needed bookend to Ware. Spencer could not even break into the starting lineup until his third year with the team. Even with Ware demanding the attention of the blocking scheme each week, Spencer has never been able to land more than 6.5 sacks in a season. Simply put, the time may be short for him as a starter in Dallas... 2009 fourth round pick Victor Butler has served as a backup over the past three seasons and has 8 career sacks in that limited playing time. He could get a serious look as a starter during the preseason and is likely to have a bigger role in 2012 even if he does not start. This year's fourth round selection Kyle Wilber might be up next if someone doesn't step up this season... Inside linebacker Sean Lee spent most of his rookie season of 2010 battling a nagging injury. When he did play it was as a coverage linebacker in the nickel sub packages. Even then he looked pretty good. In 2011 he was inserted as an every down player from week one and it took little time to see why the club had used a second round pick on him. Lee missed a little better than two games of action with a dislocated wrist, then showed his toughness and leadership by playing out the schedule with varying types of casts to protect it. Despite the handicap he still finished the season with a very respectable (under the circumstances) 72 tackles and 34 assists. Lee has also demonstrated his big play potential with 6 interceptions in his young career. Dallas is in dire need of leaders on both sides of the ball. Lee is ready to step up and claim that role on the defensive side. He scored 183 fantasy points in basically fourteen games last season and could very well be in line for 200+ in 2012. The bad news is that Lee is not exactly a well kept secret. He has consistently gone among the top fifteen at the position this summer. Consider him a quality LB2 with top ten potential and step up to the plate if you want him... There will be competition between veteran free agent Dan Connor and 2011 second round pick Bruce Carter for the other inside linebacker position. Carter was slowed by injuries early in 2011 which really hurt his learning curve. His college scouting report called him a boom or bust player with a lot of raw talent and athleticism. The coaching staff would really like to see him step up and make their decision easy but thus far he has not impressed. Connor has spent the first four years of his career as a backup in Carolina. With all the injury problems the Panthers had at linebacker last season Connor finally got on the field as a starter, but even then he was never trusted to play in the sub packages. Even if he wins the starting Connor will give way to someone (probably Carter) in passing situations. If you are going to gamble on one of these guys at the end of your draft, go with Carter. He is far from a sure thing but at least he has the potential to play all three downs if he does win the job.

    Fantasy Outlook

  • ILB Sean Lee Quality LB2 at worst with top 10 potential
  • ILB Dan Connor Two down player with minimal value at best
  • ILB Bruce Carter Deep sleeper with LB3 upside at best
  • OLB DeMarcus Ware #1 defensive player in big play based leagues, decent third starter or quality depth for everyone else
  • OLB Anthony Spencer No value
  • OLB Victor Butler Deep sleeper in big play based leagues
  • OLB Kyle Wilber Long term dynasty sleeper at best
  • Defensive Backs

    Dallas finished among the bottom ten in both passing yards allowed and yards per attempt in 2011. In an effort to sure up their leaky secondary, the Cowboys put a lot of resources into improving the corner positions. Brandon Carr was among the best free agent corners available this offseason. He is a quality veteran cover man who was a four year starter for the Chiefs before signing on in Dallas. Carr has the size to be physical with big receivers, enough speed to hang with the fast ones and good instincts go with his physical ability. He will be a big upgrade at the position. In fantasy terms however, Carr is not to get excited about. Since posting 70 solo stops as a rookie in 2008, his tackle numbers have declined by leaps and bounds each season (rookie corner rule again). Last season Carr managed a career best 4 interceptions but contributed only 39 solo tackles... The other huge investment at corner came when the Cowboys gave up their first and second round picks to move up and get Morris Claiborne at number six overall. Claiborne is a ball hawk who was proven against some of the best competition in college football during his time at LSU. He is a polished player who was widely regarded as the best corner in this year's draft. There is little doubt that both of these additions will improve the Cowboys chances, but there is a lot of doubt when it comes to their box score output. The rookie corner rule will certainly be in play with Claiborne but we also need to consider the situation that he is walking into. Carr and Claiborne will be replacing Terrence Newman and Mike Jenkins as the starters. Newman started for nine seasons in Dallas but recorded more than 53 tackles and finished among the top twenty corners in fantasy production only once in the past six seasons. In three years as a starter Jenkins never made the top thirty. As a rookie starter Claiborne has to be given some consideration but there is no doubt that history is working against him... The Cowboys made great strides at the corner positions but still have a big hole at safety. Gerald Sensabaugh will enter his fourth year as a starter for the team after being a backup for three of his four years in Jacksonville. He is a serviceable starter at best and has never finished among the top twenty five safeties in fantasy terms. Sensabaugh did manage a career best 60 solo tackles and six takeaways last season but is little threat to improve much on those numbers. He is at best depth in twelve team leagues that start three defensive backs or require two safeties... Journeyman Brodney Pool is with his third club in four years and is the favorite to start at free safety. He was a marginal starter in Cleveland for three seasons before spending the last two as a backup for the Jets. Pool has the size and physical ability to be a pretty solid contributor but for some reason, has never managed to be much of a factor anywhere he has played. Both of these guys are little more than place holders until the team can better address the positions.

    Fantasy Outlook

  • SS Gerald Sensabaugh Depth at best in 12-team leagues that start three
  • FS Brodney Pool No value
  • SS Barry Church No value
  • FS Danny McCray No value
  • CB Brandon Carr Depth at best in corner required leagues
  • CB Morris Claiborne Rookie corner rule comes into play but I am less than optimistic
  • CB Mike Jenkins No value
  • CB Orlando Scandrick No value
  • Philadelphia Eagles

    Defensive Linemen

    The Eagles like to play what they call a "wide-9" scheme. The intent of this scheme is to help their defensive ends get room to maneuver against bigger offensive tackles. By lining up way out in the nine gap, the ends get a two or three step head of steam before contact, and can use that momentum to blow past the blocker on the way to the quarter back. While this puts the ends in a position to record a lot of sacks, it also spreads the defense and gives the offense a natural void off tackle that they can attack with the running game. With Trent Cole and Jason Babin as the starters, and a collection of both experienced and talented guys providing depth; the Eagles have the right players on the outside to make this concept work well. The scheme in turn, helps make Cole and Babin two of the most productive defensive ends in the game. Their only responsibility on most plays is to get into the backfield and disrupt. The quarterback is the target on every snap but if a running back with the ball happens to cross their path they will gladly hit him instead. The fact is, Cole was a beast long before we ever heard of the wide-9. He was the Eagles fifth round pick in 2005 and has proven to be an absolute steal. Cole is a bit undersized for an every down end in most situations, but has been surprisingly productive in both the tackle and sack columns throughout his career. Since 2006 he has averaged nearly 49 tackles and 10.5 sacks a season. In 2011 Cole finished at 42-5-11 despite missing three games with injury. Had he not been banged up it would have been his sixth consecutive season as a top twelve lineman. Cole is unlikely to approach the 20 sacks mark but his incredible consistency and dependability make him close as possible to sure thing. Jason Pierre-Paul and Jared Allen are the first tier of defensive linemen all by themselves, but Cole belongs near the top of the group that is right behind them... Babin is basically a clone of Cole in a lot of ways. They are very similar in both size and style of play. What is particularly interesting about Babin is the long road that brought him to last year's impressive 18 sack performance. He was the first round pick of the Texans in 2004 where became another in that long list of talented college ends who struggled with the switch to outside linebacker in a 3-4. In 2007 and 2008 he spent two injury plagued seasons with Seattle and made no impact. The Eagles picked Babin up for a song in 2009. He served as a backup that season recording 3 sacks in limited action. Babin's break came in 2010 when, at age 30, he was finally given an opportunity to start at his natural position of defensive end in a 4-3. Expecting to use him as a backup and third down rush specialist, Tennessee signed Babin to a one year low end contract that season. Injuries at the position soon provided an opportunity that Babin seized to the tune of 44-14-12.5. The Titans made an effort to keep him in 2011 but he elected for a return to the City of Brotherly Love instead. Babin was a little light in the tackle column in 2011 but his 18 sacks were right on the heels of the league leaders. His excellent numbers in consecutive seasons lay to rest any concerns that he was a one year wonder. Babin turned 32 in May but has only been a full time player for three of his seven previous seasons in the league, so he has less mileage on him than most starters his age. He will be hard pressed to match last year's stellar sack total and will probably record a few less tackles than Cole, but Babin deserves to be right there with his teammate in that second tier of defensive linemen. 35-40 tackles and 12-15 sacks are very realistic expectations... The Eagles have very good depth at the end positions as well. Darryl Tapp was the second round pick of the Seahawks in 2006 and was a serviceable starter for them between 2007 and 2009. He posted 40 or more tackles in each of those three years with a career best of 7 sacks in 2007. There are several teams in the league that Tapp would be starting for... Brandon Graham was the Eagles first round selection in 2010 and has a lot of potential, but has spent most of his young career in the trainer's room. He is very talented and could become an impact player at some point if he can stay healthy... Rookie second round pick Vinny Curry had to be somewhat disappointed when a team as deep as Philadelphia called his name on draft day. This was far from a need for the Eagles but Curry's skill set is a great fit in the scheme and made him simply too good to pass up at that point. Tapp may not have the sack potential that the others bring, but any of these three guys have the potential to be a productive second starter for IDP owners if they get an opportunity... With the ends spread so wide there is a lot of ground to cover between them and the interior linemen. This was a big problem in 2011 as opponents gashed the Eagles with off tackle runs. To plug this huge hole the team needed two things; physical linebackers with enough quickness and range to fill the void, and defensive tackles with enough size the hold the point of attack, but enough speed and athleticism to cover more ground than most interior linemen are expected to cover. In Cullen Jenkins they have one of those guys. Jenkins spent the first seven years of his career in Green Bay where he battled injuries from time to time, but was very successful as both a defensive tackle in a 4-3 and at defensive end when the Packers made the switch to the 3-4. He plays the run very well and has exceptional range for a man of 300+ pounds, but is also a strong inside pass rusher. Jenkins has 36 career sacks including the 5.5 he put up as an Eagle last season. That sack total was the third best of Jenkins career but the 33 solo tackles were a new high for him. He was among the top twelve interior linemen in fantasy production last season and is a great fit in the scheme. There is no reason to believe he will not repeat or even improve on last year's numbers... Mike Patterson has been a mainstay at tackle for the Eagles since 2005 but his career may be jeopardy due to a brain condition. He had surgery several months ago and has been slow to recover. The procedure was initially not thought to be career threatening but developments since the surgery obviously have the team concerned. They were concerned enough in fact, to use the twelfth overall pick on Mississippi States Fletcher Cox. Cox came out as a junior and is just 21 years old. He has room to grow physically as well as technically but is a rare athlete for his size. He has the versatility to play either tackle or end but will line up on the inside for the Eagles the vast majority of the time. Speed and quickness allow Cox to cover a lot of ground while he uses his hands very well to escape blockers. In short, he is just what the Eagles needed to hold down the tackle position opposite Jenkins. Cox is not a sure thing by any stretch, but has the potential to put up 30+ solo tackles and should make a very respectable contribution in the sack column as well. With his upside Cox is probably worth drafting as a sleeper second starter in tackle required leagues, but I would feel much more comfortable picking him up as my number three so I could make a move if he fails to produce... In Derek Landri and Antonio Dixon Philadelphia has quality veteran depth on the inside, but neither of those guys has the skill set to succeed as a long term starter in the wide-9.

    Fantasy Outlook

  • DE Trent Cole Perennial top 10
  • DE Jason Babin Quality DL1 with the potential to challenge for the league sack crown
  • DE Darryl Tapp Injury sleeper with DL3 potential
  • DE Brandon Graham Deep/Injury sleeper with a lot of upside if he gets a chance to play
  • DE Vinny Curry Deep/Injury sleeper with good long term potential
  • DT Cullen Jenkins Solid DT1 or excellent DT2
  • DT Fletcher Cox Sleeper with a lot of upside, likely a good DT2 or better
  • DT Mike Patterson No value at this time
  • DT Derek Landri No value
  • DT Antonio Dixon No value
  • Linebackers

    The Eagles went into last season with high expectations of their young linebackers, and especially last year's fourth round pick Casey Matthews. By the time they realized their mistake it was too late to do much about it. Matthews started a couple of games in the middle and simply looked overmatched. He may eventually get another shot but that is not going to happen this season. The coaching staff spent all of 2011 shuffling guys around and trying to stop the bleeding. Linebacker play in general improved later in the year but not until the hole was too deep for the team to dig out of. The organization strongly addressed the position over the offseason, to the point that linebacker play should not be an issue in 2012. Their first move was to acquire middle linebacker DeMeco Ryans from the Texans. Ryans fell out of grace with new Houston defensive coordinator Wade Phillips, who did not see the veteran as a good fit in the 3-4 scheme. The Eagles on the other hand, could not have been happier to get him. Ryans is a proven leader that the Philadelphia coaching staff sees as an every down player. They expect his play and his leadership to have an immediate impact in the win column. I expect the move to the Eagles to have an immediate impact for Ryans in the tackle column. In 2006 he turned in one of best rookie performances in the history of IDP fantasy football. That season Ryans was 126-30-3.5 with three takeaways and finished as the fantasy games top linebacker. His numbers came back to earth over the next three years but Ryans accounted for at least 86 solo stops in each of his first four seasons. In 2010 he was well on the way to another strong year when he suffered an Achilles injury in week six. Ryans was not the same player early last season, which may have had a great deal to do with the injury. Whatever the reason, he fell into a two down role and saw action on fewer than 60% of the team's defensive snaps. Ryans is now two years removed from the injury and is getting a fresh start. Before taking a single meaningful snap he is already the best middle backer in an Eagles uniform since the retirement of Jeremiah Trotter, and finds himself in a situation/position ripe with fantasy potential. I may be overly optimistic here because I have always been a big Ryans fan, but I expect a return to the top twenty and will not be at all surprised if Ryans once again graces the top twelve. He is consistently being drafted outside the top twenty five and would be a steal as a third starter... The second big move by the organization came in April when the Eagles used their second round pick on California's Mychal Kendricks. With 159 combined tackles and assists, the former Golden Bear was among the most productive linebackers in college football last season. The 11.5 sacks and 3 interceptions he recorded over the past two seasons speak volumes about his big play potential as well. Indeed when Jene Bramel, Sigmund Bloom and I got together after the draft to talk about rookie defenders, we agreed that Kendricks may well have the most upside of all the rookie linebackers. We also agreed that his current situation will certainly not help to that end. Kendricks played in the middle throughout his college career but the Eagles plan to stick him in IDP purgatory on the strong side, at least for the time being. Kendricks is blazing fast for a linebacker, is smart and brings a physical presence that the Eagles have been lacking. He could end up being a major big play threat along the lines of Von Miller, but the coaching staff will likely be more interested in using his abilities to close that void off tackle in the run defense. He excels in coverage which will likely keep him on the field in all the sub packages and might be enough to make Kendricks as much as a decent third starter for us this season. If he is ever moved to the middle however, this guy could be very special. His long term value is basically tied to the performance of Ryans. If the veteran plays well he may be the Eagles middle backer for a long time. If Ryans struggles or is injured, Kendricks would be the next in line for the job. Pick up the rookie as a very late round sleeper in redraft leagues or stash him on a taxi squad in dynasty leagues and hope he gets an opportunity to move inside. Let me remind everyone that Brian Urlacher was a strong side linebacker as a rookie. We all know how that turned out... Third year pro Jamar Chaney fills out the starting lineup at weak side linebacker. He saw some work in the middle as a rookie before moving to the strong side to open last season. When Matthews struggled, Chaney was quickly moved back inside where he started the rest of the way. He was very inconsistent in box score terms but the most telling part of this tale is that Chaney was pulled from the sub packages in favor Matthews over the final month of the season. Regardless of his role, Chaney is unlikely to have much of a box score impact now that he is competing with the likes of Ryans and Kendricks for tackles... Matthews, Brian Rolle and Akeem Jordan provide the depth at linebacker. They could all contribute on a situational or short term basis if called upon, but the Eagles will be in trouble if one of their new additions were to go down.

    Fantasy Outlook

  • MLB DeMeco Ryans Quality third starter with high LB2 potential
  • WLB Jamar Chaney Minimal value at best
  • SLB Mychal Kendricks Possible LB3 or quality depth as a strong side backer, huge potential if he ever lands in the middle
  • WLB Brian Rolle No value
  • SLB Akeem Jordan No value
  • MLB Casey Matthews No value
  • Defensive Backs

    Problems at the linebacker positions made the Philadelphia secondary a busy place in 2011. Unfortunately the Eagles had similar issues at safety though they seemed to find their answer quicker there. Jarrad Page and Kurt Coleman were the starters at strong and free safety respectively in week one. Page lasted until week five when he was benched and shortly after released. Coleman was benched after week three but was brought back as the strong safety in week six. Nate Allen was a backup until week four when he became the starting free safety. All the while rookie second round pick Jaiquawn Jarrett, who was expected to make an immediate impact, played mostly special teams. By the end of the season Eagles safeties had turned in 9 or more fantasy points sixteen times between them. Improvements in the front seven will lessen the opportunity a little but there is still a lot of production to be had here. The problem is that entering camp we cannot be certain who the opening day starters will be. Coleman and Allen played pretty well over the second half of 2011 so the coaching staff will start there. They hope Jarrett will step up and challenge Coleman and have added veteran free safety O.J. Atogwe to push Allen. Those of us who are setting on Jarrett in dynasty leagues have to be a little miffed that we have not heard his name much this summer. What little we have heard has not been very promising. At this point he does not seem to be posing much of a threat. On the other hand, those sitting on Coleman have to feel pretty optimistic that he might continue to hold some value. Consider the fact that he reached or was very near double digit fantasy points in seven of nine games before being injured in week sixteen. Coleman was the Eagles seventh round pick in 2010 and is just entering the prime of his football career. Most of my respected colleagues seem to have little confidence that he is the long term answer at strong safety for the Eagles. While I have to admit than I am not completely sold on him, I liked what I saw late last season and am cautiously optimistic about his long term potential. He is not the most naturally talented of players, but showed a great deal of determination and heart. The strong safety position in Philadelphia has a long rich history of quality box score value. Whoever holds that job is going to be productive for us. Coleman seems to be that guy for the short term at the least and could be there for a long time if he continues to grow into the position. He is most certainly worthy of late round consideration and has been a mostly forgotten man in drafts this summer... Allen was the Eagles second round pick in 2010. He started thirteen games as a rookie, missing the other three with injury, but was not particularly impressive. Allen has good size but does not play a physical style of football. He is good in coverage and has pretty good ball skills that have produced 5 picks in two years, but has just not been a real difference maker on the field or in the box scores. Being a young player he too may grow into the job in his third season and could be the long term answer for the Eagles at the position, but there is no reason to believe he will become a fantasy factor... Atogwe is by far the most established and experience safety on the Eagles roster. He was the Rams starter at free safety from 2006 to 2010 and started eight games for the Redskins last season. When the Eagles signed him in June there were all sorts of speculative reports that he was not being considered for a starting job and that Atogwe is willing to accept a backup role etc. I read what the man said after signing and there was no mention of his accepting a backup role. What he said was that his role would be determined by how quickly he picked up the scheme and how well he plays. In fantasy terms Atogwe has never put up great tackle numbers but has made enough big plays to provide good value. Three times he has finished among the top twelve safeties, the last being in 2008, and over his five years as a starter in St. Louis, was never outside the top twenty five. Atogwe has 25 career interceptions including 3 last season, and 49 total career takeaways. He signed a one year deal for the veteran minimum so there is no pressure either way, but if Allen does not continue to improve it would be no surprise to see Atogwe starting at some point this season. If he gets on the field he is worth a look as depth with a little upside in most leagues... Last season's free agent gem Nnamdi Asomugha and 2008 first round pick Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie are the starters at corner, and give the Eagles one of the best cover tandems in the NFL. They do not however, give fantasy owners any value. Rodgers-Cromartie turned in a career best 49 tackles with 6 interceptions and 25 passes defended in his second year but has just 67 tackles with 3 picks and 23 passes defended in the past two seasons combined. Asomugha had a big year with 8 interceptions in 2006 but has totaled just 6 in the five years since (3 in 2011), with his best tackle production of those five years being the 35 he put up last season. Veteran Joselio Hansen will be the nickel corner this year with rookie Brandon Boykin and last year's third round pick Curtis Marsh filling out the roster and competing to establish the rest of the pecking order. I may be overlooking someone here, but can remember no Philadelphia corner who has ever been worthy of much fantasy consideration.

    Fantasy Outlook

  • SS Kurt Coleman Quality depth with DB2 upside and a risk factor
  • FS Nate Allen Minimal value at best
  • SS Jaiquawn Jarrett Sleeper with DB2 potential if he can win the job
  • FS O.J. Atogwe Sleeper who could provide depth if he wins the starting job at free safety
  • CB Nnamdi Asomugha No value
  • CB Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie Minimal value as depth in big leagues that require corners
  • CB Joselio Hansen No value
  • CB Brandon Boykin No value
  • CB Curtis Marsh No value
  • Washington Redskins

    Defensive Linemen

    The Redskins are another of the league's 3-4 teams and like most, give fantasy owners very little to work with up front. Washington had just five linemen who even showed up in the box scores in 2011. Those five players combined to record 65 total tackles. They did however, put up a rather respectable 15.5 sacks between them. With 20 tackles, 22 assists and 6 sacks Stephen Bowen was the closest thing to a productive fantasy option up front. After spending the first five years of his career mostly as a backup and rotational player for Dallas, Bowens stepped into his first full time starting job in 2011 and played pretty well. His production last season was by far the best of his career but the 95 fantasy points only landed him just inside the top 60 linemen. He should serve the Redskins well on the field but is of no value to fantasy owners... Former Rams first round pick Adam Carriker started at the other end last season and recorded a career best 4.5 sacks. He was a starter at tackle in St. Louis for two seasons before coming to Washington in 2010. In his four years as a pro Carriker has never exceeded 22 tackles in a season. Like Bowens, he will contribute to the success of the Redskins on the field but is no threat to have a serious box score impact... Jarvis Jenkins and Kedric Golston fill out the depth chart at end. Jenkins was the Redskins second round pick in 2011 but missed the season after tearing an ACL. He should be a good fit in the scheme and could push Carriker for playing time this season. With Jenkins out, Golston became the third man in the rotation last year but is unlikely to have a significant role in 2012... The one player in this group that really surprised me with his lack of production last season was nose tackle Barry Cofield. As a starting tackle for the Giants in 2010 Cofield went 40-14-4 with 3 takeaways and 4 batted passes. Active tackles in 4-3 schemes often make fairly productive nose tackles in 3-4 defenses. With that in mind Cofield's 14-10-1.5 in 2011 was a shocker. It will not take a lot for him to improve on those numbers but at this point there is nothing to suggest he will provide value even in tackle required leagues.

    Fantasy Outlook

  • DE Stephen Bowen No value
  • DE Adam Carriker No value
  • DE Jarvis Jenkins No value
  • NT Barry cofield Deep sleeper at best in tackle required leagues
  • NT Chris Neild No value
  • Linebackers

    As a unit the Redskins are very solid at linebacker. On the inside they have first ballot fantasy Hall of Famer London Fletcher and third year man Perry Riley who is a player on the rise. Until 2009 when he made his first Pro Bowl appearance at age 34, Fletcher was arguably the most underrated linebacker in the NFL. He has now been to the three consecutive Pro Bowls and could be on his way to number four. Without doing a bunch of research to prove it, I am going to say with confidence that I believe Fletcher has more career tackles (1245) than any other active player in the league. He has not missed a game since becoming a starter in his second season back in 1999, has put up at least 87 solo tackles in an amazing twelve consecutive seasons, has 90+ tackles in eleven of those seasons, and reached triple digits in four. Having averaged just less than 4 takeaways and just below 3 sacks over the past twelve seasons, Fletcher is more than just a tackling machine as well. His production and consistency are even more impressive when we consider that he has played for three different teams along the way. As for his fantasy value, Fletcher has finished no lower the number thirteen in any season since '99 and has been in the top five eight times, including each of the past two years. He has to slow down at some point and at age 37 that could happen at any time, but Fletcher has thus far shown no sign of decline. He will once again be the leader and centerpiece of the Redskins defense and should be picked among the top ten linebackers in redraft leagues. There has been no hint of retirement from him, but dynasty owners will have to consider his age. Dynasty owners should also consider the potential of Riley to step up when Fletcher does hang up the cleats. Riley replaced Rocky McIntosh as the starter in week ten last year and played very well down the stretch. He is a downhill thumper against the run but is also a very capable pass defender. Riley stayed on the field with Fletcher in most sub packages last season and should continue to do so in 2012. From a production standpoint Riley put up numbers very similar to those of McIntosh in recent years, with the exception that Riley seems to make more of a big play contribution. In his eight starts he was on pace to go roughly 70-66-2 with 4 takeaways, 8 passes defended and 190 fantasy points. Those numbers would have placed him inside the top twenty at the position. His late season production in 2011 seems to have been overlooked by a lot of owners. Riley's ADP in the mid 30s has been well below what his production would suggest and makes him a strong value pick as a third starter with LB2 upside. McIntosh was a solid player and a good compliment to Fletcher, but was never going to be the eventual successor. Riley is a young player who is still getting better and has the potential to take over the leadership role in the next year or two. With this consideration he has a little extra value for dynasty owners... One important side note when considering the value of all Redskins players; the Washington stats crew is very generous when it comes to awarding assists. In fact only the Colts were credited with more than the 386 assists given to Washington defenders. This is a big value boost for Riley and Fletcher in particular as inside linebackers were credited with 131 (34%) of them in 2011... Lorenzo Alexander has worked as a backup at outside linebacker in recent years but has been moved inside this season. He will compete with former Giants and Rams backup Brian Kehl for a spot in the pecking order behind the starters. Neither of these players have shown a lot of promise or potential to date. One guy we should keep an eye on here is rookie fourth round pick Keenan Robinson. He has pretty good speed; good cover skills and was a three year starter on the inside for Texas. His scouting report suggests that he may be a better fit on the outside but the Redskins are looking at Robinson as a developmental inside backer. If he pans out, Robinson could be starting alongside Riley in a couple of years. He is a long shot at this point but may be worth tucking away on a taxi squad for safe keeping if you have room... Brian Orakpo and Ryan Kerrigan are very good bookends at the outside linebacker positions and will likely be there for several years to come. Orakpo has averaged a strong 9.5 sacks over his three seasons as a pro but needs to make more tackles and big plays if he is going to become one of the league's elite at the position. He has yet to total more than 38 solo stops in any year and has forced only 4 fumbles in three seasons. The sack total alone is enough to give Orakpo decent value in big play based leagues but he is not worth a roster spot in most situations... Kerrigan was the team's first round pick last season and was impressive as a rookie. At 42-21-8 with 4 forced fumbles and an interception for a score, he really turned some heads. Like all 3-4 outside backers, Kerrigan is going to fall short in the tackle columns, but he has to potential to become a LaMarr Woodley type player with a lot of value in big play leagues.

    Fantasy Outlook

  • ILB London Fletcher Quality LB1 with top 5 potential
  • ILB Perry Riley Solid LB2 with LB2 potential this year and LB1 potential in the long term
  • ILB Lorenzo Alexander No value
  • ILB/OLB Keenan Robinson Dynasty sleeper
  • OLB Brian Orakpo Decent LB2 or quality LB3 in big play based leagues
  • OLB Ryan Kerrigan Quality LB2 or excellent LB3 in big play based leagues
  • OLB Rob Jackson No value
  • Defensive Backs

    Washington finished a respectable twelfth against the pass in 2011 but there are still some serious issues with the secondary. This is particularly evident at the safety positions where both of last year's opening day starters are wearing different uniforms this summer. As a result the club hit free agency hard to try and fill the void. Brandon Meriweather, Tanard Jackson and Madieu Williams were all added to compete with holdovers Dejon Gomes and Reed Doughty for the open jobs. All three of the veterans bring significant starting experience but there is a reason they were all available free agents. Meriweather was a first round pick of the Patriots in 2007. He earned a starting job in 2008 and went on to post career best numbers of 61-22-2 with 6 takeaways and 9 passes defended. His production steadily declined over the next two years and he was cut by the team last September. Meriweather landed with the safety needy Bears where he spent the rest of last season as a backup and was not offered a contract for 2012. The Redskins signed him to a two year deal in March, after which he promptly went out and got arrested for DUI. The coaching staff believes that Meriweather fits well in their scheme and he will enter camp at the top of the depth chart at free safety, but they have made it clear that he is not even guaranteed a spot on the roster... Jackson was the fourth round pick of the Buccaneers in 2007 where he started forty four games before being injured in 2009. Through twelve games prior to the injury he was on the way to a huge statistical season. After that he was in and out (mostly out) of the lineup with various injuries and suspensions in before being released in April after failing a physical... Williams spent four years as a box score productive starter in Cincinnati before signing with Minnesota in 2008. He started there for three seasons. As a result of the Vikings cover-2 scheme his box score production went down the drain. Williams spent last season on the bench in San Francisco. The incumbents have just as much chance at winning a job here as do the newcomers. Gomes was the team's fifth round pick last season and saw some action as a starter late in the year. The coaching staff talked him up in the press but his play on the field failed to match the glowing accolades. He looked good at times but was not very consistent. Doughty has seen a lot of time as a starter for the team over the past three seasons. He is not a standout or a big play threat but has proven to be a dependable option when called upon. The coaching staff sees Doughty as quality depth and would ultimately like to have him as their third or fourth safety. I took the time to break down all of these guys not only because this is a wide open competition, but also because there is a lot of box score potential to be found here. In 2009 Doughty and LaRon Landry combined to produce 152 solo stops. In 2010 Landry racked up 66 tackles in just 9 games. And last season the safety positions accounted for 148 tackles and 8 takeaways. The problem here is sort of like the old cliché we hear with quarterbacks, if you have 5 safeties you really don't have any. This is especially true with a Mike Shanahan coached team. Knowing how he shuffled players at these positions (and others) last year, we could have a different starting combination every week. The bottom line is that we should probably avoid this situation all together until/unless someone emerges from the pack... Fortunately the corner positions are much easier to figure out. Deangelo Hall returns as the team's clear cut number one. He is not only strong in coverage but is among the few perennially box score friendly players at the position. If not for missing a few games in 2009, Hall would be on a run of five consecutive seasons with at least 60 tackles and 15 passes defended. Over that five year span he has 23 interceptions with 32 total takeaways and has been among the top ten at the position in fantasy points four times. Hall's 167 fantasy points last season were good enough to land him as the number seven corner and number eighteen defensive back over all. His production in 2012 should be similar... Josh Wilson started opposite Hall last season and is a pretty good number two in NFL terms. Unlike Hall however, Wilson's box score production has been sparse at best. He was a top ten corner as a first year starter with the Seahawks in 2008, but has not made the top twenty in a season since. Wilson could face stiff competition for the starting job from free agent addition Cedric Griffin. The former Viking was a top ten corner for three consecutive seasons before suffering a major knee injury early in 2010. He returned last season and played fairly well but may not have been all the way back from the injury. Now that he is two years removed, Griffin should be 100%. At 6'2" and 205 pounds, he is a big physical corner that can match up with the leagues bigger receivers. He excelled in the press and zone coverage of the Vikings cover two and does not shy away from run support. I see Griffin as an excellent compliment to Hall and believe he may well push Wilson into the nickel corner job. Consider Griffin a sleeper with the potential to be a second starter in corner required leagues.

    Fantasy Outlook

  • SS Brandon Meriweather Sleeper with DB3 upside at best
  • FS Tanard Jackson Sleeper with DB3 upside at best
  • FS Madieu Williams Sleeper with DB3 upside
  • FS FS Dejon Gomes No value
  • SS Reed Doughty Deep sleeper with limited upside
  • CB DeAngelo Hall Quality CB1 or good DB3
  • CB Josh Wilson Depth in corner required leagues at best
  • CB Cedric Griffin Sleeper with CB2 potential
  • CB Kevin Barnes No value
  • New York Giants

    Defensive Linemen

    At last we come to the Super Bowl Champion Giants; the only team in the league with the potential to have three defensive ends with double digit sacks at the end of the season. Jason Pierre-Paul exploded in just his second season as a pro. At age 22 he led the league in tackles by a defensive linemen with 67, and his 17 sacks ranked fourth overall. Pierre-Paul is a freakish athlete with a huge wingspan and better than prototypical speed. It is almost scary that with his age, Pierre-Paul's best football is probably in front of him. At this point he and Jared Allen are in a tier all by themselves at the top of the DL list. By this time next year Pierre-Paul might have set another new standard... The track record of both Justin Tuck and Osi Umenyiora proves they have the potential to join Pierre-Paul among the ranks of those with 10 or more sacks this season. For that to happen both of them will have to get over the injury bug that bit them in 2011. From 2007 to 2010 Tuck was a one man wrecking crew both on the field and in the box scores. He totaled 47 or more solo tackles in four consecutive seasons, averaged just better than 10 sacks, accounted for 20 turnovers, was a top three lineman three years in a row and twice finished at number one. His 2011 campaign was marred by a number of different ailments including a sore groin, a mild ankle sprain and a sore shoulder. The most serious of the injuries by far was the sore neck that bothered him all season. Tuck only sat out four games completely but both is play on the field and his box scores suffered greatly. Offseason surgery in February should solve the shoulder issue and time is expected to resolve the rest of the problems. There was not much discussion about Tuck's health heading into training camp and no news us usually good news in these situations. If healthy he will start opposite Pierre-Paul and should once again land among the top ten fantasy options at the position. The injuries however, have to be a little bit of a concern. Enough so to drop Tuck into the middle of the second tier simply because there are a few guys who should put up similar numbers with less risk... Umenyiora finally got paid and even accepted the fact that he will probably not be a starter for the team this season, at least not in title. While that is very positive news for the team, fantasy owners should be careful with their expectations for him. Umenyiora was inactive for seven games last season with knee and ankle injuries, but basically missed eight having left very early in week twelve. He should be over those issues now but even when healthy, has hardly been a model of consistency over the past several years. Since 2005 Umenyiora has reached 13 or more sacks three times, those totals coming in 2005, 2007 and 2010. In 2004, 2006 and 2009 he recorded 7 or fewer and he missed all of 2008 with an injury. His tackle production has been just as inconsistent, with a career low (in a non-injury year) of 18 solo stops in 2009. Since 2004 Umenyiora has turned in four top five performances and three times finished well outside the top twenty. With 16 tackles and 8.5 sacks Umenyiora proved last season that he can be successful in as the Giants third end. The one year deal he signed this offseason is worth 6.5 million dollars, and we know that the Giants have done a great job of getting their best linemen on the field together in the past. It is a safe bet that Umenyiora will get plenty of opportunity to rush the passer, and he will likely exceed double digits in sacks if he can stay healthy. There is some injury risk to be considered but I believe the bigger risk is that his tackle production will suffer greatly in the part time role. Even at 30 or so tackles Umenyiora's sack numbers should make him a quality second starter or an outstanding DL3. All things considered, I just do not see him making that DL1 tier in his current situation. Dynasty owners should pay particular attention to the fact that his new deal is for just one season. Umenyiora may have publicly stated that he accepts his role as a backup but on the inside it does not sit well that he is not starting. I look for him to be the top free agent at the position after this season unless the Giants tag him again... The Giants got very good play from their interior line as well in 2011. Linval Joseph stepped into the starting role in his second season and showed why the club elected to use a second round pick on him in 2010. He is a 323 pound road block who did an excellent job anchoring the run defense, but pass rush is not a strength of his game. Joseph's biggest contribution in that aspect is that his 6'4" frame allows him to block some passing lanes and he has the power to push the pocket into the quarterback. From a box score perspective Joseph was pretty productive as defensive tackles go in 2011. At 34-15-2 he was among the top fifteen interior linemen in fantasy points last season. Joseph may never produce more than 2-4 sacks in a season but he has the potential to be a 35-40 tackle guy on a consistent basis over the next several years. Pick him up as a second starter or quality depth with a little upside in tackle required leagues... Chris Canty returns as the other starting tackle. Canty is very similar to Joseph in that he too is a tall (6'7") stout run defender with average at best pass rush skills. Canty will be entering his eighth season in the league and his third with the Giants. He has hardly been a fantasy stud thus far in his career but the 31 tackles, 16 assists and 4 sacks he recorded last year were all new career highs. He finished a couple of slots ahead of Joseph in the final fantasy rankings and has to be considered for a starting spot in tackle required leagues that start two. While Canty was the more productive last season, I believe Joseph has a bit more potential going forward... Veterans Shaun Rogers and Rocky Bernard will compete with last year's second round pick Marvin Austin for playing time behind the starters. Austin had a lot of promise coming out of North Carolina before spending his rookie season on IR with a torn pectoral. If healthy he would likely be the third man in the mix and could be productive if one of the starters were to go down.

    Fantasy Outlook

  • DE Jason Pierre-Paul Likely the top DE in the fantasy game and potentially the first defensive player off the board on draft day
  • DE Justin Tuck Top 10 DL if healthy
  • DE Osi Umenyiora Risky and inconsistent with potential to be a quality DL2
  • DT Chris Canty Second starter with limited upside in tackle required leagues
  • DT Joseph Linval Solid DT2 with low end DT1 potential
  • DT Shaun Rogers No value at this time
  • DT Marvin Austin Injury sleeper with DT2 potential if he gets on the field full time
  • DT Rocky Bernard No value
  • Linebackers

    If there is a weakness with the Giants defense it is at the linebacker position, and particularly at middle linebacker. This position has been a revolving door for the past few seasons as the club continues get by with patchwork solutions. Last season there were four different starters at MLB with Chase Blackburn being signed off the street in late November and starting the final four regulars season plus all four playoff games. Blackburn was resigned in April and enters camp at the top of the depth chart. What we need to keep in mind here is that there was a reason Blackburn was a street free agent last November. He is a serviceable player at best who is entering his eighth season and has been has been a career backup for the club. He was undrafted coming out of college in 2005 and has never put up more than 40 tackles in a season. In fact he has recorded more than 20 just twice. Blackburn may hold onto the job if only because the Giants neglected the position yet again this offseason. His strongest challenge will come from former Cincinnati weak side backer Keith Rivers who is trying to revive his career in New York. Even if Blackburn wins the job he will not be on the field in passing situations and will be inconsistent at best. Rivers could be an interesting prospect. The 2008 first round pick of the Bengals has some talent but has struggled with injuries throughout his brief career, including a dislocated wrist that cost him all of 2011. When healthy Rivers was a two down player for the Bengals and failed to make much of an impact. He is expected to get a look with the first unit at some point during camp, but is currently working as the middle backer with the second team. For now Rivers is thought to be the top backup at all three positions. He might be worth a shot as a last round deep sleeper but like Blackburn, would likely be a two down player even if he were to win the job... Michael Boley and Mathias Kiwanuka will fill the starting roles at weak and strong side respectively. Boley is by far the top fantasy prospect of the group, which is not necessarily saying a lot. The 74 solo tackles he recorded last season seem a little weak at a glance but consider that he missed a couple of games with injury. When slotting him on your draft board think more along the lines of 84 tackles with a handful of big plays and about 185 fantasy points as his 2011 production. Those numbers would not be bad if we could count on him being that productive again. The rest of the story when it comes to Boley, is that the 74 tackles were the second most of his career and by far his best numbers in three seasons with the Giants. In 2009 and 2010 Boley totaled just 66 and 64 tackles respectively. His fantasy output in 2010 was a mere 120 points. On the positive side, Boley is the Giants best coverage linebacker and will be on the field in all situations. He is coming off a good season in which he would have led the club in tackles had he not missed time, will have the same role in 2012 and is not surrounded by guys who will provide a lot of competition for tackles. The potential is clearly there for Boley to have another good season but with his history, there is certainly some risk. He could be as much as a quality third starter but I would hesitate to trust Boley as more than my fourth linebacker... At 62-22-3.5 Kiwanuka had the most statistically productive season of his six year career in 2011. His numbers were helped by the fact that he played in some if not most of the sub packages over the course of the season. Kiwanuka is a converted defensive end that was moved to strong side linebacker a couple of years ago simply because the coaching staff needed to get him on the field and had no room at end. He has grown into the role and gives the Giants a physical presence against the run as well as an athlete who can contribute to the pass rush from the position. Due to his responsibilities within the scheme Kiwanuka will struggle to post useful fantasy numbers on a consistent basis, but his quality play went a long way toward helping strong safety Antrel Rolle lead the club in tackles last season.

    Fantasy Outlook

  • MLB Chase Blackburn Minimal value at best
  • WLB Michael Boley Quality depth with LB3 upside
  • SLB Mathias Kiwanuka Depth in very deep drafted leagues at best
  • MLB/WLB Keith Rivers Deep sleeper with limited potential
  • MLB Greg Jones No value
  • SLB Clint Sintim No value
  • Defensive Backs

    The statistic of total passing yards allowed shows the Giants ranked near the bottom of the league last season, but that can be misleading. They were actually tied for tenth in the more important category of yards per attempt and their 20 interceptions tied them for sixth. As such the club made only minor changes in personnel over the off season with most of those involving depth. They were however, counting on getting Terrell Thomas back after losing him to a knee injury before last season. Unfortunately Thomas recently had a setback with the ACL and as of July 30th his status was in question. Thomas was the fantasy game's top corner in 2010 and was coming off back to back top three rankings when he was lost last year. At best he is a high risk prospect at this point and may not be so productive if he is able to play at all. Even so, with his history Thomas is probably worthy of a very late round flier unless outcome of his impending scope brings bad news. Corey Webster and Aaron Ross were the opening day starters at corner last season. Thinking that Thomas would be back, the Giants allowed Ross to move on in free agency. Webster will be in the lineup again this season and if Thomas is lost, will likely be paired with last year's first round selection Prince Amukamara. Webster has been a starter for the Giants over most of his seven year career. He is a quality cover corner that has really come on in the big play columns with 11 takeaways over the past two years, but has never been very productive as a tackler. He is physical enough to get the job done but does not seem to relish contact or run support duties. Webster has never finished with more than 48 tackles in a season or among the top twenty corners in fantasy terms. There is no reason to believe he will break that trend now... Amukamara. missed most of last season with a foot injury that was still giving him trouble in June. With Thomas out, Amukamara. has been seeing time with the first team in the early days of training camp. At 6'0" and 207 pounds, he is a big athletic corner who, when healthy, can run with any receiver in the league. Despite his size Amukamara. is not the most physical of corners. With his very limited time in 2011 many offenses might see the second year pro as basically a rookie which means he could have a lot of opportunity. With only a few days of training camp in the books, there is a lot yet to be determined at this position and there is no guarantee that anyone will give us much production. The best course of action here would probably be to avoid the situation for now and keep an eye on the developments as the summer unfolds... The Giants have gotten very dependable play from their safeties over the past couple of seasons. There is some discrepancy over which of the starters is actually the strong safety and which plays free in this scheme so let me put that to rest. In the Giants scheme the safety positions are often interchangeable and the alignment of Antrel Rolle and Kenny Phillips do not always follow the typical strong and free designations. As a result both will line up at either position on occasion. It is Rolle however, who spends the most time up near the line in a run support alignment and/or aligned on the strong side behind Mathias Kiwanuka. Phillips on the other hand, is more often working with the typical "center fielder" responsibilities of a free safety. Thus it is Rolle who is going to consistently be the more box score friendly of the two. What surprises me is how little respect he gets from IDP owners. We are talking about a defensive back that has exceeded 75 solo tackle in four of the past six seasons and in both of his years with the Giants. Rolle led the Super Bowl Champions with 82 tackles last season and finished among the top fifteen safeties. Yet his ADP this summer has been way down in the late twenties range. He can be counted on for quality tackle production but the downside to Rolle's game is a shortage of big plays. He is physical in run support but prefers to play it safe most of the time rather than gamble. The lack of game changing plays will limit Rolle's upside, but consistency makes him a quality third starter or excellent depth in most leagues... Phillips is actually bigger than Rolle but despite being 6'2" and 217 pounds, tends to be more of a finesse player. When the Giants selected Phillips in the first round five years ago, fantasy owners had grand expectations. He has fallen well short of those expectations thus far in his career but has not been a complete bust. Phillips has never exceeded 60 solo tackles in a season but may have done so in 2011 had he not missed one game. He finished at 59-23-0 with a career best in both interceptions with 4 and passes defended at 11. They got there in different ways but in the end, Phillips and Rolle posted nearly identical fantasy points in 2011... New York likes to use a third safety in a lot of their sub packages. Deon Grant served in that role over the past two seasons but the coaching staff was looking for second year pro Tyler Sash to take over those duties this year. Sash is fighting a hamstring injury early in camp that may prompt the club to resign Grant for one more year.

    Fantasy Outlook

  • SS Antrel Rolle Quality DB3 or excellent depth
  • FS Kenny Phillips Solid DB3 or quality depth
  • SS Tyler Sash Injury sleeper if he can get healthy himself
  • FS Chris Horton No value
  • CB Corey Webster Depth at best in corner required leagues
  • CB Terrell Thomas Risk reward pick that is heave on the risk at this time
  • CB Prince Amukamara No value
  • CB Jayron Hosley Deep sleeper in corner required leagues
  • That does it for the preseason. Football is right around the corner, and I plan to be back with an update or two once we get to lay eyes on some preseason action. Best of luck to you in all those drafts!

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